Quotes on Leadership from Twitter

March 17, 2016

Here is some of wisdom tweeted by my favorite people:

  1. Stay on track. Don’t give your critics the ammunition they expect. – Larry Weidel
  2. Your ability to build & lead team to solve complex problems will define you as a leader, deal maker and innovator. – Tim Sanders
  3. Be stubborn about your goals, and flexible about your methods. – Vala Afshar
  4. Impatience only makes you look week.  It is a principal impediment to power. – Robert Greene
  5. Learning is NOT NOT NOT a linear process!!!!!!! – Tom Peters
  6. Stop what you are doing and decide to do something of long term value! What can you do today, that will have an impact file years from now. – James Shepherd

How to Receive Constructive Feedback

March 8, 2016

20160224_165321-01 Receiving feedback in the workplace isn’t always easy. Sometimes it can be hard to take constructive (or negative) feedback and turn it into a positive response. If you have received feedback that was not up to your expectations, the last thing you want to do is cause an emotional outburst. Here are some top tips on how you can control yourself with negative feedback, avoid confrontation and utilize feedback to become a better employee.

  1. Let your boss express his or her ideas fully: always be sure to let your boss finish what she/he is saying and do your best to understand what is being said. Paraphrasing exactly what you are being told and making sure to let the other person finish is very important. This way you can demonstrate that you’ve heard their opinion and that they had full opportunity to express their opinion.
  2. Always evaluate feedback: Looking for particular reasons for a particular feedback you got is important. Be sure to look at the situation and examine some of the underlying aspects. If your boss has expressed feedback in an emotional outburst, for example, you may want to consider some of the other factors like he/she being under overwhelming pressure from management or poor conditions at home.
  3. Keep yourself in check: Responding to feedback with a negative response can put your job growth prospects in danger. Be sure to keep yourself in check with your nonverbal responses and with the emotion in your voice.
  4. Work to alter behavior: the only way that you can use negative feedback is to work at altering your behavior. Use feedback to find workplace goals and then avoid certain behaviors to become a more effective employee.
  5. Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification: If you are unsure of the specifics of negative feedback be sure to ask a number of clarifying questions on how you can improve or specific actions that you are doing that could be causing inefficiency. A good boss will be able to identify a number of alternatives to your behavior or to your workplace practices.

Use these top tips when receiving feedback from your boss so that you can use it to the fullest extent.

Further reading:

You choose the title of this post

July 1, 2015

Reading a magazine’s very last page and very last item sounded very familiar to me in a different context.  It quoted Emma-Jayne Winson, the first female jockey to win the Queen’s Plate, Canada’s oldest thoroghbred race, in 2007.  Here it is from May 2015 issue of Canadian Business.
Ask a jockey: Is it hard to build a relationship with a horse you’ve just met?

“When I took lessons, I remember complaining that I wanted to ride this horse every week, and I never got the same horse.  I always got a differet one. But being on horses that maybe I didn’t get along with taught me to be a better rider and to communicate better with animals that weren’t necessarily on the same page.  It’s amazing how you can assimilate something so simple into everyday life.”

Now relate this story to the times when you wanted certain key people in your team, but couldn’t; or had to operate with constraints that you felt were slowing you down. I believe every challenge shapes us to be bit more flexible, innovative, disciplined, collaborative and resilient.

One mantra helps instead of complaining or whining, it is change the mindset.  Accept that it is not an ideal situation (rarely idean conditions exist in any environment, be it business or social), but how can you make the best use of it and what way you are going to learn from it.  Usually, all such circumstances become good stepping stones.

A picture is worth a thousand words

March 22, 2015

 Don’t get stuck on design without looking into user experience


Don’t start refinement too early or else you may miss out best solution



How random data can be interpreted depends upon experience and creativity


Always remember, keep is succinct as much as possible




Credit pictures – Internet. If any of the above shared image is owned by you, please send me complete info and source of image, I will gladly mention credit on this page.

5 Leadership Quotes

May 22, 2014


It all comes down to the decisions a leader makes. I believe following 5 quotes will inspire you as well.

  1. Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. – Henry Ford
  2. By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. – Ben Franklin
  3. Diversity in counsel, unity in command. – Cyrus the Great
  4. Chance favors the prepared mind. – Louis Pasteur
  5. Deliberate often. Decide once. – Latin proverb


Solving the Blabbing Leader Problem | Leadership Freak

April 24, 2014

This is ONE of the excellent posts of 2014. It has lots of good actionable info. Read it and apply it.


Art of Encouragement – its more than just saying ‘good job’

November 13, 2013

Once I was asked a straightforward question that when all are paid to do their job, why we need encouragement or praise here? Why won’t people do what they are supposed to do?


As George Matthew Adams said, there are high spots in all of our lives and most of them have come about through encouragement from someone else. I don’t care how great, how famous or successful a man or woman may be, each hungers for applause.

Some people offer encouragement in a boisterous way. They dole out lavish and effusive praise, bear hugs, and hearty cheers or applause. Other encouragers turn to techniques that are quiet and subtle: a soft smile, a kind word, or a light touch on the hand. But regardless of the form that encouragement takes, it carries amazing potential—the potential to lift a person’s spirits while helping them to stay focused on their goals.” (Quoted Julie Exline – Psychology Today)

Encouragement does following 5 main things to people which has direct relation to success of the organization.

  1. fuels the passion to do better and exceed expectations
  2. sets expectations and helps people evaluate on their own merit
  3. strengthens the self-esteem
  4. reinforces positive work environment
  5. increases appetite for taking calculated risks by being creative and innovative

en·cour·age·ment – (noun) – something that makes someone more likely to do something

praise – (verb) – to express approval of (someone or something)

When it comes to encouragement, it’s either a thank you email or keep up the good work statement. So praising is good and we all like it, which happens after the action or any achievement. Praising serves as encouragement for next venture but it is only for people who have contributed towards that specific achievement. Its like

While encouragement is something done before and during any action taking place to rally our troops to the goal. Anyone can given encouragement.

When Encouraging Others, Keep In Mind:

  • False praise discourages others. Praise only real and specific achievements, even if you have to identify individuals and their contributions.
  • Encouragement can be a smile, a nod, a clap or a pat on the back but go beyond saying keep up the good job; if you want people to exceed your expectations.
  • When encouraging be sincere and attentive, take time to recognize.
  • Usually meetings end frantically because no time is left, as a leader ensure its your job to take a moment and say specific words of encouragement.
  • Be consistent and ensure small snafus do not blow the sockets off
  • Timely encouragement is important; a stitch on time saves nine.
  • Observe for signs of discouragement – limited or no engagement / participation, don’t care attitude, body language, etc.

How to Encourage:

  1. Foster collaboration among teams & organizations
  2. Processes and disciplines are required to succeed, but they need to be refined with time and as technology changes. Be the champion of taking down the barriers in achieving efficiency & productivity.
  3. Trust your people and let them make decision.
  4. Delegate some of the work & meetings to your team and ask for information, this will help you grow them and identify star players.
  5. Stay engaged by recognizing people at the right time, giving clear directions and suggestions when required, asking for input and showing respect.
  6. People make mistakes, understand the effort and planning that went in, provide insight and help ensure it does not get repeated.
  7. When needed, take actions required to address the problem. Discipline of the organization must be maintained.
  8. Take the responsibility of your team. Understand where buck should stop.

Encouragement is a valuable gift that we can give without any expense and it rewards both giver and receiver. It builds relationships, drives positive growth, improves corporate bottom line while giving satisfaction to employees. Encouraging right people at right time in a right way does wonders.

More  – http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/light-and-shadow/201311/the-quiet-power-encouragement

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